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Weird Maths

At the Edge of Infinity and Beyond

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Is anything truly random? Does infinity actually exist? Could we ever see into other dimensions?

In this delightful journey of discovery, David Darling and extraordinary child prodigy Agnijo Banerjee draw connections between the cutting edge of modern maths and life as we understand it, delving into the strange – would we like alien music? – and venturing out on quests to consider the existence of free will and the fantastical future of quantum computers. Packed with puzzles and paradoxes, mind-bending concepts and surprising solutions, this is for anyone who wants life’s questions answered – even those you never thought to ask.

David Darling is a science writer and astronomer. He is the author of many books, including the bestselling Equations of Eternity, and the popular online resource The Worlds of David Darling. He lives in Dundee, Scotland.

  • Publisher: Oneworld Publications (February 1, 2018)
  • Length: 288 pages
  • ISBN13: 9781786072658

‘Remarkable.’

– TLS

‘A glorious trip through some of the wilder regions of the mathematical landscape, explaining why they are important and useful, but mostly revelling in the sheer joy of the unexpected. Highly recommended!’

– Ian Stewart, author of Significant Figures

‘Darling and Banerjee take us on a captivating ride through a vast landscape of mathematics, touching on mesmerising topics that include randomness, higher dimensions, alien music, chess, chaos, prime numbers, cicadas, infinity, and more. Read this book and soar.’

– Clifford A. Pickover, author of The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension

‘In this inspired collaboration, a young maths prodigy teams up with a popular science writer to present a fresh view of the world of mathematics. Together they fearlessly tackle some of the most weird and wonderful topics in mathematics today, rightly believing that “if you can’t explain something in plain language then you don’t properly understand it”. Clearly, they understand it.’

– John Stillwell, Professor of Mathematics, University of San Francisco, and author of Elements of Mathematics